March 2019 Meeting Recap

The Interagency Committee of State Employed Women, ICSEW, had another successful meeting March 26 full of informative presentations and interactive training. Below is a recap of the guest presentations. Note: Meeting minutes and training session handouts are available on our Meting Minutes page.

Women holding a book in front of a podium
Amy Leneker (far left) coaches a couple of meeting attendees during her Clifton Strengths seminar.

Amy Leneker

Amy Leneker gave an interactive training on identifying and maximizing one’s Clifton Strengths.

Clifton Strengths are named after Dr. Don Clifton, former chairman of The Gallup Organization. Gallup conducted several years of research on personality types. The research suggested people who best understand their strengths and behaviors will be best-equipped to deploy those strengths in their personal and professional lives.

Leneker showed meeting attendees how to find their top five strengths. She taught attendees how to best use those strengths, and recognize when those strengths become weaknesses. She did a couple of individual coaching sessions. Workshop attendees also got to team up with partners for an exercise that allowed attendees to brainstorm ways to combine different strengths.

Women writing in workbooks at a table
ICSEW reps, alternates and guests fill in responses in their Clifton Strengths workbook during a professional development training.

For more information on Clifton strengths or to take the Clifton Strengths assessment, go to:

https://www.gallupstrengthscenter.com/home/en-us/cliftonstrengths-how-it-works

Dr. Arne Gundersen

Man pointing to PowerPoint slide about teeth.
Dr. Gundersen illustrates the effects of gum disease.

Dr. Arne Gundersen, from Gundersen Dental Care  in Thurston County gave a health and wellness talk. His presentation, “The Link between Oral Health and Wellness,” illustrated the correlation between periodontal disease and its impact on our overall health.

He said periodontal disease (the body’s inflammatory response to infections caused by buildup of bacteria and debris around the teeth and gums) can put you at risk for more serious diseases like diabetes and heart attacks.

He offered a series of preventative tips like using electric toothbrushes and/or a water pic.

Women’s History Month

collage of women representing various occupations
Image courtesy of pixabay.com

March is Women’s History Month. Rebecca Llewellyn, the Governor’s Industrial Safety and Health Conference and Events Manager for the Department of Labor and Industries also gave a brief presentation on events L&I sponsored for Women’s History Month.

L&I has a Women’s History Month Display in its lobby with a newsletter with Women’s History Facts and a list of books and movies on women’s history.

Health & Wellness: Oral Health Impacts Overall Health

toothbrush
image courtesy pixabay.com

By Tanyah Williams, Washington State Patrol

Did you know healthy teeth and gums can affect your heart health?

Dr. Arne Gundersen, from Gundersen Dental Care  in Thurston County gave a health and wellness talk at at a recent ICSEW meeting. His presentation, “The Link between Oral Health and Wellness,” illustrated the correlation between periodontal disease and its impact on our overall health.

Using slides featuring oral anatomy drawings, Gendersen explained periodontal disease, an inflammatory response due to an infection or buildup of bacteria or debris around the teeth. Bacteria can infiltrate blood vessels and over time release proteins into the blood stream.

Man standing in front of PowerPoint slide of a tooth
Dr. Gundersen speaks at the ICSEW’s March 2019 meeting at the Department of Labor and Industries. Photo by Rachel Friederich

He also noted some research that links between oral health and the body’s cardiovascular system. For instance, Gundersen said there’s evidence that poor oral health can be linked to cardiovascular disease, which includes stroke heart attack and hemorrhaging.  Gundersen said researchers are also trying to figure out if poor oral health has a correlation to diabetes. He said researchers believe periodontitis can affect sugar levels in the body.

Gundersen offered some steps you can take between dentist appointments to improve your oral health to reduce your risk of periodontal disease and other serious health problems.

Dr. Gundersen’s Tips For Better Oral Hygiene

  • Brush and floss daily.
  • Invest in a water pic. This helps minimize the bacteria build up that brushing and flossing may miss.
  • Give an electric tooth brush a try. Brushing with a regular brush involves a lot of manual circular motions, which a lot of people don’t do correctly. An electric toothbrush does the motion for you.
  • Use bleach. Combine 1 teaspoon of bleach with one half cup of water to form a rinse.  Do this no more than twice a week.  DO NOT SWALLOW.
  • For those who grind and/or clench their teeth, use a night guard. Grinding and clenching teeth wares down bone quickly and a night guard can prevent this from happening.

 

 

Save the Date! 2019 Health and Wellness Fair is May 22

ICSEW 2017 blank flyer Vertical LgTUMWATER–The Interagency Committee’s annual Health and Wellness Fair will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, May 22 at the Department of Labor and Industries in Tumwater. The event is free.

This year’s theme is “Homerun to Health.” Dozens of vendors will have booths on various health and wellness related topics. There will also be fitness booths, experts on nutrition, physical, mental and financial wellness and interactive presentations.

Attendees can take a survey for a chance to win a prize raffle.

The ICSEW Health and Wellness Fair is held in May to coincide with National Women’s Health Week, NWHW. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Office of Women’s Health uses this week to encourage women to make health a priority and build positive health habits at every stage of life.

Location & Parking Information:

Washington State Department of Labor and Industries: 7273 Linderson Way SW, Tumwater

L& I has a limited amount of visitor parking spots. Overflow parking is at Mountain View Church of the Nazarine, 940 Israel Road SW, Tumwater

Click here for a downloadable flyer to share with your agency: Health Wellness Flyer 2019

January Meeting Recap

  • Gwen Voelpel from Integris Performance Advisors gave tips on how to become a more effective leader by encouraging us to align our actions with our values which leads us to be more authentic and credible. Participants assessed their personality traits using DiSC model. Once participants categorized their prominent traits (Dominant, Influential Steady Conscientious,) Vopel highlighted ways for us to hone our individual styles to build a more cohesive team in the workplace.
woman standing in front of screen in classroom
Gwen Voelpel
Woman pointing to screen in classroom
Elisa Law from the Washington State Historical Society gives an overview of plans for events related to the centennial of women’s suffrage.

Votes for Women Centennial grants will be available to fund non-profits and public entities to support programming that celebrates the national suffrage centennial across the State of Washington. The grants will fund programming that will take place in 2020. Grant applications are available here.

A curriculum will be launched in the summer of 2019 for schools and community groups to use. An in-house exhibit in the history museum will be on going along with traveling exhibits throughout the state. A large celebration is planned in Olympia during August 2020. There are many more ways to celebrate this historic event with information available at www.suffrage100wa.com and www.washingtonhistory.org/research/whc/milestones/centennial/ .

man standing at podium alongside posture slides on scren
Dr. Jaron Banks goes over some exercises to improve posture
  • Jaron Banks, of the Russell Chiropractic Center in Tumwater discussed the importance of posture while sitting at your desk.   He explained the need to get up and move from time to time and shared corrective stretching exercises that can be done in your office or cubicle.

Successful Health & Wellness Fair

This year’s fair was a huge success!  It ran from 11:00am -1:00pm, and drew over 457 attendees and 57 vendors that offered chair massages, health screenings, product samples, and giveaways. Most participants enjoyed a healthy food demonstration along with delicious samples throughout the fair.  During this event our team distributed giveaway bags, survey cards, a cell phone fan, and a bottle of water.  Due to the large number of attendees, our supplies were depleted by noon!

We heard many great comments from participants and vendors alike.

“This is our favorite fair to attend. The people are responsive and the fair is well-run.” –Vendor

“I’m pleasantly surprised how many vendors participated, and am impressed with this fair.” –Attendee

We believe those who attended this event found it to be educational, interactive and applicable to their physical, emotional, social, and financial well-being in order to maintain a healthy life.

H&W 3

 

February is American Heart Month

hearthealthHeart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year, killing approximately one woman every 80 seconds.  Fortunately, we can change that because 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. The American Heart Association has developed “Life’s Simple 7,” seven-steps to reduce risk for heart disease and stroke.

  1. Manage Blood Pressure
    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. When your blood pressure stays within healthy ranges, you reduce the strain on your heart, arteries, and kidneys which keeps you healthier longer.
  2. Control Cholesterol
    High cholesterol contributes to plaque, which can clog arteries and lead to heart disease and stroke. When you control your cholesterol, you are giving your arteries their best chance to remain clear of blockages.
  3. Reduce Blood Sugar
    Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (or blood sugar) that our bodies use for energy. Over time, high levels of blood sugar can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves.
  4. Get Active
    Living an active life is one of the most rewarding gifts you can give yourself and those you love. Simply put, daily physical activity increases your length and quality of life.
  5. Eat Better
    A healthy diet is one of your best weapons for fighting cardiovascular disease. When you eat a heart-healthy diet, you improve your chances for feeling good and staying healthy – for life!
  6. Lose Weight
    When you shed extra fat and unnecessary pounds, you reduce the burden on your heart, lungs, blood vessels and skeleton. You give yourself the gift of active living, you lower your blood pressure and you help yourself feel better, too.
  7. Stop Smoking
    Cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. If you smoke, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health.

To learn more visit: http://www.heart.org
SOURCE: http://www.heart.org

 

 

 

Glaucoma: 5 Things You Should Know

glaucoma-photo

January 30, 2017 • By Jullia A. Rosdahl, Practicing Glaucoma Specialist, National Eye Health Education Program Glaucoma Subcommittee and Duke University Department of Ophthalmology

I don’t know about you, but at the start of each new year, I resolve to eat healthier, exercise more, and sleep in when I can! Some years I follow through with my promises, and some years I fall short. My days can be very hectic, and sometimes it’s hard to find time to take care of myself.

But, as an ophthalmologist, I always make sure to keep eye health at the top of my list. While it’s my profession, I also know that vision is directly related to my quality of life. Feeling your best includes seeing your best, too. And part of seeing your best is being aware of eye diseases and your risk for them.

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month — the perfect time to spread the word about glaucoma and encourage others to add learning about the disease to their list of resolutions.

To help get you started, here are the five things you need to know about glaucoma.

1.Glaucoma can cause vision loss and blindness that can’t be reversed. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve, which affects your vision since the optic nerve sends visual images to your brain. You can save your vision with early detection and treatment of glaucoma.

2.There is only one way to know if you have glaucoma. Getting a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the only way to find out if you have glaucoma. During the exam, an eye care professional places drops in your eyes to widen the pupils and looks for signs of the disease in the optic nerve.

3.There are no early symptoms. Glaucoma often has no early warning signs. No pain. No discomfort. No blurry vision. Advanced glaucoma will affect your vision, but you shouldn’t wait for symptoms to visit your eye doctor!

4.In the United States, half of the people who have glaucoma don’t know they have it. Nearly 3 million Americans have glaucoma, and half don’t know it. Lack of awareness and lack of symptoms prevent people from getting the disease diagnosed early. You can change that! Find out if you have glaucoma by visiting an eye doctor.

5.Some people are at higher risk than others. African-Americans over 40, adults over 60 (especially Latinos), and people with a family history of glaucoma are at higher risk. That makes early detection important. Are you at higher risk? Find out by talking to your family to find out if anyone has had glaucoma.

Now that you’ve got the facts about glaucoma, make a resolution for healthier vision. Schedule a comprehensive dilated eye exam today! And encourage your friends and loved ones to do the same.

To learn more about glaucoma, visit http://www.nei.nih.gov/glaucoma.

Soup: It’s what’s for dinner

tomatosoup.jpg

Submitted by: Dana Bowen

Is there anything better than a bowl of delicious homemade soup? How about a homemade soup that cooks itself? Well, here’s one for you, try this Crock Pot Creamy Tomato Soup and not only satisfy your need for homemade comfort, but do it with minimal effort. Enjoy!


Crock Pot Creamy Tomato Soup

Servings: 6  • Size: 1-1/2 cups • Points +: 5 pts • Smart Points: 7 Calories: 177 • Fat: 10 g • Carb: 17 g • Fiber: 3 g • Protein: 8 g • Sugar: 8 g Sodium: 600 mg  • Cholesterol: 21 mg

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 cup finely diced celery
  • 1 cup finely diced carrots
  • 1 cup finely diced onions
  • 28 oz. can whole plum tomatoes, with juice
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil
  • 3 1/2 cups reduced sodium chicken broth (or vegetable for vegetarians)
  • Parmesan or Romano cheese rind (optional)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/3 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese
  • 1 3/4 cups reduced fat (2%) milk, warmed
  • salt, to taste
  • black pepper, to taste

Directions:

Heat a large skillet over medium heat, then add the oil, celery, carrots and onions; cook 5 to 6 minutes, or until golden. Add to slow cooker.

Pour the juice of the tomatoes into the slow cooker, then roughly crush the tomatoes with your hands; add to slow cooker. Then add chicken (or vegetable broth), the cheese rind (if using) thyme, basil, and bay leaf.

Cover and cook on LOW for 6 hours, until the vegetables get soft and the flavors blend. Remove the cheese rid and, using an immersion blender, blend the soup until smooth (or you can carefully do this in small batches in the blender).

Melt the butter over low heat in a large skillet and add the flour. Stir constantly with a whisk for 4 to 5 minutes. Slowly whisk in about 1 cup of the hot soup, then add the 1 3/4 cups of warmed milk and stir until smooth. Pour back into the slow cooker and stir, add the grated Pecorino cheese and adjust salt and pepper, to taste.

Cover and cook on low 30 more minutes.

Makes about 9 1/4 cups.

SOURCE: Skinnytaste.com

 

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

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January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, and ICSEW wants you to know that there’s a lot you can do to prevent cervical cancer.

HPV (human papillomavirus) is a very common infection that spreads through sexual activity. About 79 million Americans currently have HPV, but many people with HPV don’t know they are infected. HPV is also a major cause of cervical cancer. Each year, more than 11,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer.

The good news?

The HPV vaccine (shot) can prevent HPV. Cervical cancer can often be prevented with regular screening tests (called Pap tests) and follow-up care.

In honor of National Cervical Health Awareness Month, ICSEW encourages:
Women to start getting regular Pap tests at age 21
Parents to make sure pre-teens get the HPV vaccine at age 11 or 12

Teens and young adults also need to get the HPV vaccine if they didn’t get it as pre-teens. Women up to age 26 and men up to age 21 can still get the vaccine.

Thanks to the health care reform law, you and your family members may be able to get these services at no cost to you. Check with your insurance company to learn more.

Did you know?

The FDA has approved a two-dose schedule for the Gardasil HPV vaccine for males and females ages 9-14?

Taking small steps can help keep you safe and healthy.

To learn more visit the National Cervical Cancer Coalition at http://www.nccc-online.org/