Women’s History Month: Representation in Corrections

For #WomensHistoryMonth, the Washington State Department of Corrections interviewed two female corrections employees about the challenges women can face in the corrections field and advantages women bring to corrections.

Women’s History Month: How State Employed Women Have Impacted Our State’s History

By Amal Joury, ICSEW Chair As Women’s History Month comes to a close, I want to encourage you to reflect on the work  the newly-formed Blacks United In Leadership and Diversity (BUILD) business resource group ICSEW does and continues to do. Since before Washington gained its statehood from a territory in 1889 to now—women have…

March 2019 Meeting Recap

The Interagency Committee of State Employed Women, ICSEW, had another successful meeting March 26 full of informative presentations and interactive training. Below is a recap of the guest presentations. Note: Meeting minutes and training session handouts are available on our Meting Minutes page. Amy Leneker Amy Leneker gave an interactive training on identifying and maximizing…

Serving educational needs…

Maxine Mimms, born in Virginia, March 4, 1928, she earned her B.A from Virginia Union University in 1950, and began working with communities in Detroit earning her Ph.D. in education administration from Union Graduate School. In 1953, Maxine worked in Seattle Public Schools and with the Seattle Public School Administration. Ms. Mimms’ assisted the director…

A story teller…

Esther Hall Mumford, born in Louisiana, January 20, 1941, fell in love with the history of African Americans and dedicated her life to telling their story. Growing up hearing the stories of her grandmother and witnessing first hand segregation, Esther held those truths deeply. After attending the University of Baton Rouge for one year, she…

Dr. of Dentistry and Community Outreach…

Dr. Rosalie Reddick Miller, born in Georgia December 29, 1925, attended all African-American public schools and lived through her fair share of discrimination and segregation. Her father continued to tell her that she would become a dentist and, in 1951, Rosalie received her D.D.S from Fisk College. During the 1950’s in Georgia, Miller and her…

An educational legacy…

Nora B. Adams, born in Texas, November 20, 1928; her father was the local principal of the African American school and her family encouraged her to seek the best education possible. Nora moved to Dallas and graduated from Booker T. Washington High School in 1945. In 1946, Nora moved to Seattle and received her B.A…

Working for equality…

Bertha Pitts Campbell was born in Kansas, June 30, 1889; she became a prominent civil rights activist in Seattle. Bertha was the only African American student at Montrose High School where she delivered the valedictorian address in 1908. She attended Howard University as one of the 22 women at the school and co-founded Delta Sigma…

Going the distance…

Helga Estby born May 30, 1860 traveled from Norway and arrived in Michigan in 1871. In 1876, she married and ventured to Mica Creek near Spokane, Washington. Due to the Panic of 1893 and her husband’s injuries, the family farm and the family of ten were in jeopardy. The mother and eldest daughter took on…