Accommodations for Employees with PTSD

This article was originally distributed by the Washington State Disability Inclusion Network (DIN) Business Resource Group.

Disability Inclusion Network

The Disability Inclusion Network would like you to join us in celebrating October as National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Be on the lookout for the rest of the month on ways you can help celebrate.  

Workplace Accommodations for Employees with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

“Dealing with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at work can be stressful. Navigating flashbacks, panic attacks, and hypervigilance is difficult in any setting, but managing these symptoms in a workplace can feel impossible. When you’re constantly worrying about judgment from your coworkers and peers, it can be hard to focus on the job at hand.

Being in close proximity with coworkers can be stressful for someone with PTSD for a number of reasons. While other workers might not mind cramming into a small break room or meeting room, many people with PTSD don’t like their personal space to be invaded. The average worker might find loud conversations and background chatter in the office to be a minor annoyance, but those types of distractions could be tough for someone with PTSD to handle.”

What accommodation must an employer provide for PTSD?

Once informed of its employee’s PTSD, the employer must provide a reasonable accommodation. All accommodations are based on the circumstances; there is no one-size-fits-all accommodation. To determine the proper accommodation, the employer must engage in the “interactive process” with the employee. (The Kaufman Law Firm)

Questions to ask:

  • Has the employee with PTSD been consulted regarding possible accommodations?
  • What limitations is the employee with PTSD experiencing, and how do these limitations affect the employee’s job performance?
  • What specific job tasks are problematic as a result of these limitations?
  • What accommodations are available to reduce or eliminate these problems?
  • Do supervisory personnel and employees need training regarding PTSD and workplace accommodations?

 Accommodation Ideas:

Here are some accommodations for PTSD symptoms that are typically very easy to implement:

  1. Flexible scheduling
  2. Noise canceling devices, i.e. headphones
  3. Written instructions and requests
  4. Allowing for phone calls to support persons during the work day
  5. Modifying break schedules
  6. Allowing assistance animals
  7. Modifying workplace lighting
  8. Repositioning desk, cubicle, or office location
  9. Disability awareness training for staff
  10. Organizational tools
  11. Time management training
  12. Allowing music or headsets
  13. Reducing non-essential job functions (i.e. Sunshine Committee, cleaning schedules)
  14. Regularly scheduled supervision/feedback
  15. Consistent shift scheduling
  16. Providing a mentor

 Also check Accommodation Ideas Ask Jan: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Job Accommodation Suggestions

Disability and Inclusion Network Intersectionality Lunch and Learn Sept. 17

Intersectionality is a popular word in today’s news, but what does it mean for people with disabilities who are experiencing other forms of marginalization and identities, such as being Black, immigrant, or transgender?

Join the Disability Inclusion Network for a Lunch and Learn led by Carrie Basas, Director of the Governor’s Office of the Education Ombuds, where we discuss what intersectionality is from a disability perspective and how we can act in solidarity to advance racial and disability justice, as well as social change. Let’s create a WA workplace together where we can bring our whole selves.

Register now for this virtual Lunch and Learn

September 17th 2020

12:00-1:00 Pm

If you need accommodations for this event please email DIN@OFM.WA.GOV

Registration is now open for the ICSEW-BRG Joint Allyship Gathering

You’re Invited!

BRG-ICSEW Allyship Gathering: Lifting Every Voice

Join Washington State’s Business Resource Groups (BRGS) and the Interagency Committee of State Employed Women (ICSEW) for an interactive, virtual gathering on intersectional allyship!

Register early here: 

BRG-ICSEW Allyship Gathering: Lifting Every Voice

The gathering takes place on 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Special Instructions: Please add your BRG(s) name after your last name so we can track representation from each BRG

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting

The purpose of this event is to:

1. Promote Intersectional Allyship by:

  • Sharing about each group
  • Developing an understanding of different to be an active ally
  • Opening space for members to connect with other communities on a human level

2. Provide attendees with actionable avenues to be an effective ally for different communities

3. Unify and prepare all communities to collaborate to achieve shared goals

If you need special accommodations to attend this event, contact DIN@ofm.wa.gov.

 Thank you and hope to see you at the gathering!

 

April is Diversity Month: A Message from Your State Business Resource Groups

“There is no such thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives.” -Audre Lorde 

diversity

Washington State’s six Business Resource Groups (BRGs) are excited to present the following message in celebration of Diversity Month.

During Diversity Month, the business resource groups wish to generate awareness about the intersectionality of characteristics that make us unique and the need to demonstrate appreciation for each human being we encounter.  This month, we encourage you to create space for courageous conversations about identity and to learn more about someone who appears to have a different cultural background or experience from your own. Some ways to learn include: engaging in open dialogue, reading a book, watching a movie or video clip and more, all with an open and empathetic heart.

Statewide BRGs unite employees who identify with common backgrounds with allies under shared values and goals. All BRGs have a mission and goals outlined in their charters and bylaws. BRGs contribute to an overall statewide business strategy in advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in a respectful workplace.  Each BRG member brings unique knowledge and perspective, making them an asset to our state business needs, helping Washington move closer to being the employer of choice.

Visit the Office of Financial Management’s website or select the links below to learn more about each BRG.

Thank you for choosing to be a public servant for the people of Washington State!