January 2021 Meeting Preview: Resolve to Survive, Revive and Thrive

image of fireworks courtesy Pixabay.com

by Julie Hyde, Washington State Department of Health

It’s a new year, and most of us are looking forward to fresh beginnings and hope for better things after the unprecedented events of 2020.

For the first meeting of the new year, ICSEW will have presentations on building resiliency after a crisis and how to successfully manage stress.  We’ll also have a news update from the Washington State Women’s Commission.

You’re invited to join the Interagency Committee of State Employed Women on Zoom and Facebook Live from 8:30 am to noon on January 19, 2021.

Attendees should register via EventBrite. When you register on EventBrite, you will receive an email with Zoom instructions.

All regular ICSEW meetings are free and open to anyone, regardless of gender or employment status.  A 1-hour ICSEW executive board meeting immediately follows the regular meeting, which is also open for attendees to observe.

Descriptions of the presentations are below:

How to Survive, Revive and Thrive Professionally in a Crisis

Are you feeling overwhelmed, ineffective, worried or stressed about your professional life during this COVID-19 crisis? You are not alone! We are not only facing a health crisis but also an economic crisis that the world has never experienced before.

It’s OK not to know what to do when your very survival is threatened. However, once we can move ourselves and our loved ones into a safe environment and have a moment to breathe, there are some simple tools that will give you a professional advantage during this COVID-19 pandemic.

In this presentation, Ann Hiatt, will share with us some extraordinary insights about how to SURVIVE, REVIVE, AND THRIVE Professionally in the midst of crisis. 

Washington State Women’s Commission Update

The Washington State Women’s Commission improves the life of every woman by ensuring equitable opportunities and removing systemic barriers through engagement, advocacy, and public policy, while being inclusive of our diverse populations.

The Women’s Commission recently appointed Regina Malveaux as its new director. Malveaux will speak about very important topics including the impact of COVID-19 on women and internet access crisis for families working from home.

Building Resilience to Manage Stress

During these challenging times building resilience is key to managing stress. In this presentation you’ll learn how stress can impact you, ways resilience can help you weather life’s ups and downs, strategies to build and maintain resilience, and supports and resources available.

About the Presenters

Ann Hiatt

Ann Hiatt is a Silicon Valley veteran who received her initial business training during 15 years as the Executive Business Partner to Jeff Bezos (CEO of Amazon) and Chief-of-Staff to Eric Schmidt (CEO and Executive Chairman at Google/Alphabet).

Her very first job was at 16 when she worked at a startup in Redmond, Washington called MusicWare – back when no one knew what a startup was. Growing up in Seattle during the original dotcom boom, surrounded by companies like Microsoft, Amazon and Starbucks, was a master class in innovation and it changed the course of her life.

Hiatt  now consults with executives and companies across the globe to reverse engineer their moonshot goals and get results by applying the lessons of innovation, ambition, growth at scale and forward-thinking leadership she learned at Amazon and Google. Aside from this, Hiatt is committed to democratizing the internet and bringing underrepresented voices to the forefront

Hiatt  is a sought-after international speaker, angel investor and sits on several boards in the UK. Ann has recently relocated from Silicon Valley to Europe and brings with her a unique perspective on what it takes to succeed in business today. Ann is also the author of Bet On Yourself which will be published by HarperCollins in 2021.

Regina Malveaux

Appointed to Governor Jay Inslee’s cabinet as Director of the Washington State Women’s Commission, Regina Malveaux has served as one of our nine inaugural Commissioners for the past two years. Malveaux  has over 20 years of experience as a tenacious advocate for women and children as a non-profit executive, victim’s services provider, community leader and policy advocate.

Malveaux served as CEO of the YWCA, Executive Director of the YWCA South Hampton Roads, Legal Advocate at the YWCA San Diego and founder of the Women’s Legal Center. Through her work with the YWCA, she established a national reputation as an aggressive advocate on issues related to gender-based violence and funding supports for families experiencing poverty.

Malveaux  holds an undergraduate degree in Social Policy from San Diego State University, a law degree from Howard University School of Law and a certificate in Non-profit Management from the Harvard University School of Business. During law school, she worked in both the White House and in Congress, for First Lady Hillary Clinton and the Honorable Maxine Waters respectively.

She has worked to train a new generation of advocates as an adjunct professor in Political, Women’s and African American studies at San Diego State University, the Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Old Dominion University, and Whitworth University.

Malveaux  has served on a number of boards aimed at advancing racial justice, economic empowerment and victim safety including the San Diego NAACP, Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the Alliance for Gun Responsibility and the YWCA USA. Malveaux  is the mother of two adult children and currently resides in Olympia.

Kari Uhlman

Kari Uhlman is an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Counselor for Washington State and a Licensed Mental Health Counselor. She supports public employees and family members in identifying and resolving personal and workplace concerns and provides EAP presentations on work/life topics throughout Washington State.  Prior to becoming a counselor, Uhlman was in the field of training, leadership, and organizational development for 20 years in healthcare and higher education.

Uhlman has a special place in her heart for foster and adopted children as she previously specialized in working with these families. 

Gov. Inslee Announces Three New Appointments to Women’s Commission

 

From the Office of Gov. Jay Inslee:

Gov. Jay Inslee appointed three commissioners to the Washington State Women’s Commission earlier this month. Quinn DalanAnna Franklin, and Vicki Lowe are the newest members of the Commission working to dismantle structural barriers facing women in Washington. Regina Malveaux was named commission director in August

Dalan serves as executive director of the Yakima County Volunteer Attorney Services. She began her career as a deputy prosecuting attorney in Yakima and has spent most of her legal career in the county. Dalan is an active member of YMCA Yakima’s iMentor program and other service organizations in Yakima County working to help women, especially women in marginalized communities, move past systemic and institutional barriers. 

Franklin has 27 years of experience working to improve healthcare disparities, currently serving as director of clinical effectiveness for Providence Health Care in Spokane. In this role, she works to address all social determinants of health within different communities. Franklin has sat on the Ethics Committee and served as chair of the Diversity, Inclusivity, and Equity Committee, both at Providence.

Lowe currently serves as executive director for the American Indian Health Commission in Sequim. Lowe is a member of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe in Washington state and Bella Coola First Nation in Canada and began her career in health care after seeing first-hand the inequities facing tribal members in accessing health care services. 

“These three women have invaluable knowledge and expertise of the ways in which different socio-economic factors impact women in our state,” Inslee said. “I know that they will be valuable additions to the Commission and I look forward to working with them to make Washington a more equitable state.” 

“I am extremely excited to have such a talented and experienced group of appointees as we continue the important work of the Women’s Commission,” Malveaux said. “The Commission’s mission of improving the lives of every woman in the state of Washington by ensuring equitable opportunities and removing systemic barriers has never been more important. Together, with the passionate women who serve on the Commission, I look forward to working toward a day when every woman will be healthy, safe, prosperous and empowered to achieve their full potential.”

2019 Transition Celebration Recap

Story and Photos by Tanyah Williams, Washington State Patrol
& Rachel Friederich  ICSEW Communications Chair
 

group of women standing in rotunda
ICSEW members listen to a tour guide inside the Legislative Building rotunda

More than 60 ICSEW members and guests attended the ICSEW’s annual Transition Ceremony & Celebration at the Washington State Legislative Building in Olympia July 16. 

The ICSEW welcomed 31 people who had become representatives or alternate members for their state agencies over the past fiscal year. The ICSEW also recognized 20 representatives and alternate representatives who had completed their service.

It also included two professional development trainings and an update from Rep. Doglio about new legislation impacting women and families that went into effect July 1 and work of the Washington State Women’s Commission.  The commission works to improve the well-being of all women in the state of Washington. It has up of nine voting members and four seats held by legislators who serve as non-voting advisory members. Doglio holds one of the legislative member seats.

Renee Smith

Renee Smith
Renee Smith talks about making work more human

Renee Smith, Director of the Workplace Transformation at the Results Washington, Office of the Governor, spoke on Human Work:  Leading and Teaming in an Era of Empathy.   

Smith says the best, most productive teams, are ones that make workplaces more human though loving gestures. But historically, workers have been trained to work in environments that are the opposite of love: fear.

Smith did research on this phenomenon by collecting “fear” and “love” themed stories form employees about how they were treated by leaders.  She said in fear environments, people:

  • Do not know how to be successful after change
  • Betrayed
  • Humiliated
  • Isolated during personal crisis
  • Uncomfortable during personal crisis

By contrast, in love-centered environments, employees said they:

  • Leaders cared about them
  • Had a healthy team/family
  • Felt supported in a personal crisis

So how do we make work more human?

Smith offered these tips:

  • Be there for each other
  • No more “Mean Girls” (raise each other up and don’t gossip about each other)
  • Question assumptions
  • Question ideal-era norms

She concluded her presentation with these words of wisdom:

  1. When people are comfortable, they perform better.
  2. Take off your mask.  They hide our real beauty.  They prevent us from connecting authentically.
  3.  Align words and actions.
  4. Bring our whole selves and welcome others to bring theirs.
  5. Transform workplaces with love and empathy.”

Beth Doglio

Beth Doglio
Rep. Beth Doglio gives an update about the Women’s Commission

Doglio, who represents the state’s 22nd legislative district, said the commission identified 15 priority bills in the 2019 legislative session, 11 of which passed. Doglio talked about a few of the bills enatacted into law at the Transition Celebration including:

  • HB 1303, which removes certain restrictions on subsidized health care for students at higher education institutions
  • HB 1713, which improves law enforcement response to mission and murdered Native American Women
  • HB 1166, which provides funding to eliminate a backlog of more than 10,000 untested rape kits
  • HB 1696,legislation designed to reduce the gender wage gap which prevents private employers from asking perspective candidates about their past wage histories
  • SB 5258, which would require companies that employ people who work in isolated environments (such as hostel housekeepers, janitors and security guards) to provide electronic panic buttons and sexual harassment prevention training

Linda Tilson

Linda Tilson
Linda Tilson talks about the ins and outs of networking

All attendees participated in a ‘lunch and learn’ session “Networking from a Place of Giving,” with Linda Tilson. Tilson is the co-founder of Coaching Hub.  Coaching Hub is a coaching platform that connects clients, coaches and people that support coaches together in order to accomplish their mission and vision.

Participants learned how to network using “appreciative inquiry.” Tilson says the concept of this form of networking is to “train your brain to actively listen.”

She says when most people go to a networking session, they’re taught the “30-second elevator pitch,” which is often rehearsed and scripted with key points you want to say.  But when you use appreciative inquiry, your mission is to listen to what a person is saying to find out what’s important to them.

“You lead with love, and logic comes second,” Tilson said.

For the exercise, participants paired up with a partner to respond to the question “If you could do more of something, what would it be?”  The person who was listening was supposed to ask follow-up questions to their partner to learn about the other person’s passions. At the end of the exercise, each participant had to introduce their partner and talk about something they learned about the person.

Tilson said by using “appreciative inquiry” in networking, it sets you up for more organic conversations and gives you more opportunities to share information freely and openly.

Meeting Minutes, along with the annual report and Transition Celebration program can be found here.

 

 

 

November Meeting Recap

woman standing behind a podium
Michelle Gonzalez

We had several presentations that supported the committee’s values of Leadership, Integrity, Fostering growth, Empowerment, Well-being, and Advocacy. The following is a short summary of the presentations of our distinguished guests.

As always, you can view the meeting minutes and supporting materials on our meetings page.

Director of the Washington State Women’s Commission Michelle Gonzalez gave a brief update on priorities of its three committees. These include:

  • a centennial celebration in collaboration with the Washington Historical Society to mark making the 19th amendment, giving women the right to vote.
  • economic opportunity
  • sexual harassment and gender based violent

Gonzalez also gave a tour of the commission’s website.

Debbie Baker from the Department of Revenue gave an overview of  the Paid Family Medical Leave Act. Contributions from employers and employees will start in 2019 for employee use in 2020.

Woman standing between a podium and screen
Debbie Baker

Cheri Randich from the Legislative Information Center gave an overview of the state legislative website, which included tutorials on how to find bill histories and reports.

Eileen Yoshina from the Puget Sound Education Service District gave tips on how to promote racial equity in the workplace and other areas. Yoshina said not to get discouraged if progress seems slow. She noted there are no “quick fixes” to race and race relations, but it’s important to stay engaged in the conversation.

Eileen-Yoshina
Eileen Yoshina

Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler also talked about health care reform in Washington state.

Man standing at a podium
Washington State Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler