Registration is Open for Our March 2021 Meeting

March Meeting Preview: How to Get Your Cup Filled: Overcoming Burnout

By Julie Hyde, Washington State Department of Health

hands holding a coffee cup
Image from Unsplash

We’re now a year into this pandemic. We’ve adapted to new working challenges. Though some of us have been able to start getting vaccines, it’ll still be a while before we can go back to ‘normal’ activities. In the meantime, we’re still navigating new challenges, and the stress that goes with it.

ICSEW is continuing its series of trainings in how to be our best selves in this ‘new normal.’

You’re invited to join the Interagency Committee of State Employed Women from 8:30 a.m. to noon on March 16, 2021 via Zoom for a couple presentations on stress management and self-care.

All regular ICSEW meetings are free and open to anyone, regardless of gender or employment status.  ICSEW members should register for the meeting on EventBrite. After registering on EventBrite, you will receive an email with the Zoom link. The general public will also be able to view the meeting on Facebook Live.

There will also be a 30 minute breakout sessions for subcommittee groups. ICSEW members who attend the meeting via Zoom will be able to select their subcommittee breakout room during the meeting.

The regular meeting will adjourn at noon. A board meeting will convene at 1 p.m. The public is welcome to join the meeting. It will be conducted via the same Zoom link.

The Presentations

How to Get Your Cup Filled

Are you feeling overwhelmed, ineffective, worried or stressed during this COVID-19 crisis?

Are you having trouble keeping up in your professional and personal life?

In this presentation, Linda Tilson and Jared Bull will share with strategies to overcome burnout. 

Coping With COVID-19: Behavioral Health Trends, Workforce Impacts and Resources

COVID-19 has impacted all of our daily lives. It’s not uncommon those impacts to be in ways we might not recognize. Dr. Kira Mauseth will address the specifics about where we are on a larger scale with our behavioral health responses in the contest of the pandemic as a natural disaster across the state and how our brains and bodies function accordingly at home an in the worklplace. Mauseth will discuss:

Common nuerological and physical responses at the current phase of the disaster response and recovery cycle, common symptoms and experiences, challenges we’ll likely face in the coming months and what we can do to prevent burnout and increase resilience factors as the pandemic continues.

Specific ideas will be provided about how to communicate and interact more effectively with others in the context of COVID-19, and increase our own sense of resilience.

About the Presenters:

Linda Tilson

Linda Tilson has led a team of accountants and professional staff for over 13 years as an accounting services manager for the Department of Labor and Industries. She recently completed her project coordinator certificate. Tilson is passionate about empowering individuals to take actions that lead to personal and professional success through her active leadership in mentoring, coaching, and teaching partnerships.

Jared Bull

Jared Bull is a transformational coach an entrepreneur. He works with other coaches, executives and entrepreneurs from around the world both online and offline to give them the inner tools and external resources to help them bring inner visions to life. His work has been showcased on five different continents, has a YouTube channel of 25 thousand, and has consulted within Fortune 500 companies such as Principal Financial Group. He is dedicated to showing entrepreneurs and business owners the inner and external tools to be outwardly and inwardly successful despite the volatile environments around them.  

Kira Mauseth

Dr. Kira Mauseth is a practicing clinical psychologist who splits her professional time between seeing patients at Snohomish Psychology Associates, teaching as a Senior Instructor at Seattle University and serving as a co-lead for the Behavioral Health Strike Team for the Washington State Department of Health. Her focus is on resilience and recovery from trauma as well as well as disaster behavioral health. She has worked extensively in Haiti with earthquake survivors, in Jordan with Syrian refugees and Jordanian relief workers, as well as with first responders and health care workers throughout Puget Sound the United States. Mauseth also conducts trainings with organizations and educational groups about disaster preparedness and resilience building within local communities.

AGENDA

View the agenda here

Event Brite Link

For more information about ICSEW please visit our website at www.icsew.wa.gov

2019 Transition Celebration Recap

Story and Photos by Tanyah Williams, Washington State Patrol
& Rachel Friederich  ICSEW Communications Chair
 

group of women standing in rotunda
ICSEW members listen to a tour guide inside the Legislative Building rotunda

More than 60 ICSEW members and guests attended the ICSEW’s annual Transition Ceremony & Celebration at the Washington State Legislative Building in Olympia July 16. 

The ICSEW welcomed 31 people who had become representatives or alternate members for their state agencies over the past fiscal year. The ICSEW also recognized 20 representatives and alternate representatives who had completed their service.

It also included two professional development trainings and an update from Rep. Doglio about new legislation impacting women and families that went into effect July 1 and work of the Washington State Women’s Commission.  The commission works to improve the well-being of all women in the state of Washington. It has up of nine voting members and four seats held by legislators who serve as non-voting advisory members. Doglio holds one of the legislative member seats.

Renee Smith

Renee Smith
Renee Smith talks about making work more human

Renee Smith, Director of the Workplace Transformation at the Results Washington, Office of the Governor, spoke on Human Work:  Leading and Teaming in an Era of Empathy.   

Smith says the best, most productive teams, are ones that make workplaces more human though loving gestures. But historically, workers have been trained to work in environments that are the opposite of love: fear.

Smith did research on this phenomenon by collecting “fear” and “love” themed stories form employees about how they were treated by leaders.  She said in fear environments, people:

  • Do not know how to be successful after change
  • Betrayed
  • Humiliated
  • Isolated during personal crisis
  • Uncomfortable during personal crisis

By contrast, in love-centered environments, employees said they:

  • Leaders cared about them
  • Had a healthy team/family
  • Felt supported in a personal crisis

So how do we make work more human?

Smith offered these tips:

  • Be there for each other
  • No more “Mean Girls” (raise each other up and don’t gossip about each other)
  • Question assumptions
  • Question ideal-era norms

She concluded her presentation with these words of wisdom:

  1. When people are comfortable, they perform better.
  2. Take off your mask.  They hide our real beauty.  They prevent us from connecting authentically.
  3.  Align words and actions.
  4. Bring our whole selves and welcome others to bring theirs.
  5. Transform workplaces with love and empathy.”

Beth Doglio

Beth Doglio
Rep. Beth Doglio gives an update about the Women’s Commission

Doglio, who represents the state’s 22nd legislative district, said the commission identified 15 priority bills in the 2019 legislative session, 11 of which passed. Doglio talked about a few of the bills enatacted into law at the Transition Celebration including:

  • HB 1303, which removes certain restrictions on subsidized health care for students at higher education institutions
  • HB 1713, which improves law enforcement response to mission and murdered Native American Women
  • HB 1166, which provides funding to eliminate a backlog of more than 10,000 untested rape kits
  • HB 1696,legislation designed to reduce the gender wage gap which prevents private employers from asking perspective candidates about their past wage histories
  • SB 5258, which would require companies that employ people who work in isolated environments (such as hostel housekeepers, janitors and security guards) to provide electronic panic buttons and sexual harassment prevention training

Linda Tilson

Linda Tilson
Linda Tilson talks about the ins and outs of networking

All attendees participated in a ‘lunch and learn’ session “Networking from a Place of Giving,” with Linda Tilson. Tilson is the co-founder of Coaching Hub.  Coaching Hub is a coaching platform that connects clients, coaches and people that support coaches together in order to accomplish their mission and vision.

Participants learned how to network using “appreciative inquiry.” Tilson says the concept of this form of networking is to “train your brain to actively listen.”

She says when most people go to a networking session, they’re taught the “30-second elevator pitch,” which is often rehearsed and scripted with key points you want to say.  But when you use appreciative inquiry, your mission is to listen to what a person is saying to find out what’s important to them.

“You lead with love, and logic comes second,” Tilson said.

For the exercise, participants paired up with a partner to respond to the question “If you could do more of something, what would it be?”  The person who was listening was supposed to ask follow-up questions to their partner to learn about the other person’s passions. At the end of the exercise, each participant had to introduce their partner and talk about something they learned about the person.

Tilson said by using “appreciative inquiry” in networking, it sets you up for more organic conversations and gives you more opportunities to share information freely and openly.

Meeting Minutes, along with the annual report and Transition Celebration program can be found here.

 

 

 

Using LinkedIn to Advance Your Career

By Rachel Friederich, ICSEW Communications Chair

The professional social networking site LinkedIn has 133 million users in the U.S. alone and reaches more than 200 counties and territories around the world.

So it makes sense that it can be used for career development. Everything from job searching, networking with other professionals in your field and giving and receiving career advice can all be done on Linked In.

Career Coach Linda Tilson gave a primer on how to set up and use your LinkedIn account at the ICSEW career fair May 21.

Among the tips she offered to make your LinkedIn profile as effective as possible:

Keep an Updated Profile: Members with a profile picture are more likely to get views compared to those that don’t.

Be comprehensive about current skills and objectives: Use your headline to share your main objective if it makes sense and add all of your skills to your page.

Be more than a fly on the wall. Engage with others on LinkedIn, as you would any social network. Post articles you write. Use your connections to seek—and give—career advice. The more you act as a professional, the more you’ll be noticed and build recognition. Get involved in professional groups.

Research your future boss and executive team.  Before going on an interview, or applying to a job with an organization, see if the company or your potential boss has a LinkedIn. You can use it to find out about the company’s and/or your potential boss’ likes, dislikes, important company values, etc. You can leverage this information during the interview and show you’ve done your homework.