February is American Heart Month

hearthealthHeart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year, killing approximately one woman every 80 seconds.  Fortunately, we can change that because 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. The American Heart Association has developed “Life’s Simple 7,” seven-steps to reduce risk for heart disease and stroke.

  1. Manage Blood Pressure
    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. When your blood pressure stays within healthy ranges, you reduce the strain on your heart, arteries, and kidneys which keeps you healthier longer.
  2. Control Cholesterol
    High cholesterol contributes to plaque, which can clog arteries and lead to heart disease and stroke. When you control your cholesterol, you are giving your arteries their best chance to remain clear of blockages.
  3. Reduce Blood Sugar
    Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (or blood sugar) that our bodies use for energy. Over time, high levels of blood sugar can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves.
  4. Get Active
    Living an active life is one of the most rewarding gifts you can give yourself and those you love. Simply put, daily physical activity increases your length and quality of life.
  5. Eat Better
    A healthy diet is one of your best weapons for fighting cardiovascular disease. When you eat a heart-healthy diet, you improve your chances for feeling good and staying healthy – for life!
  6. Lose Weight
    When you shed extra fat and unnecessary pounds, you reduce the burden on your heart, lungs, blood vessels and skeleton. You give yourself the gift of active living, you lower your blood pressure and you help yourself feel better, too.
  7. Stop Smoking
    Cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. If you smoke, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health.

To learn more visit: http://www.heart.org
SOURCE: http://www.heart.org

 

 

 

Glaucoma: 5 Things You Should Know

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January 30, 2017 • By Jullia A. Rosdahl, Practicing Glaucoma Specialist, National Eye Health Education Program Glaucoma Subcommittee and Duke University Department of Ophthalmology

I don’t know about you, but at the start of each new year, I resolve to eat healthier, exercise more, and sleep in when I can! Some years I follow through with my promises, and some years I fall short. My days can be very hectic, and sometimes it’s hard to find time to take care of myself.

But, as an ophthalmologist, I always make sure to keep eye health at the top of my list. While it’s my profession, I also know that vision is directly related to my quality of life. Feeling your best includes seeing your best, too. And part of seeing your best is being aware of eye diseases and your risk for them.

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month — the perfect time to spread the word about glaucoma and encourage others to add learning about the disease to their list of resolutions.

To help get you started, here are the five things you need to know about glaucoma.

1.Glaucoma can cause vision loss and blindness that can’t be reversed. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve, which affects your vision since the optic nerve sends visual images to your brain. You can save your vision with early detection and treatment of glaucoma.

2.There is only one way to know if you have glaucoma. Getting a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the only way to find out if you have glaucoma. During the exam, an eye care professional places drops in your eyes to widen the pupils and looks for signs of the disease in the optic nerve.

3.There are no early symptoms. Glaucoma often has no early warning signs. No pain. No discomfort. No blurry vision. Advanced glaucoma will affect your vision, but you shouldn’t wait for symptoms to visit your eye doctor!

4.In the United States, half of the people who have glaucoma don’t know they have it. Nearly 3 million Americans have glaucoma, and half don’t know it. Lack of awareness and lack of symptoms prevent people from getting the disease diagnosed early. You can change that! Find out if you have glaucoma by visiting an eye doctor.

5.Some people are at higher risk than others. African-Americans over 40, adults over 60 (especially Latinos), and people with a family history of glaucoma are at higher risk. That makes early detection important. Are you at higher risk? Find out by talking to your family to find out if anyone has had glaucoma.

Now that you’ve got the facts about glaucoma, make a resolution for healthier vision. Schedule a comprehensive dilated eye exam today! And encourage your friends and loved ones to do the same.

To learn more about glaucoma, visit http://www.nei.nih.gov/glaucoma.

The Women’s March turnout is at 3.3 million and counting

3.3 million.

That’s the estimated number of people who participated in women’s marches in more than 300 cities and towns across the United States on Saturday.

That figure is expected to go up, as it does not yet include data from around 200 towns and cities believed to have hosted marches across the country.
Women and men took to streets across the country, in support of women’s rights, LGBT rights, immigrant rights, and civil rights.

Washington, D.C., reportedly had the highest turnout, with 485,000 protesters, a number so large it overwhelmed the official march route, packed the National Mall and other avenues as the mass slowly moved from the U.S. Capitol to the White House. Followed by Los Angeles, with 450,000, and then New York, with 400,000 marchers. Our hometown of Olympia welcomed more than 10,000 marchers.

Women’s marches were also held in cities across the world, including London, Nairobi, Sydney, Mexico City, Athens, Moscow, Tokyo, and Antarctica, to name just a few.

HCA Plain Talk Presentation given during January General Membership Meeting

Amy Blondin speaking about Plain Talk

Amy Blondin, pictured above, and Cheryl Moore from Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA) communications department presented a short training on Plain Talk to the ICSEW general membership on January 17th.

Plain talk messages are clear, concise and visually easy to read written communications. Amy and Cheryl stressed the importance of knowing your audience while writing to create conversation that is easy for anyone to read. Additionally, make sure that you have a clear purpose and message.

For additional information on Plain Talk view their Plain Talk Presentation PowerPoint Presentation File and this document with additional Online resourcesAdobe PDF Document.

 

Soup: It’s what’s for dinner

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Submitted by: Dana Bowen

Is there anything better than a bowl of delicious homemade soup? How about a homemade soup that cooks itself? Well, here’s one for you, try this Crock Pot Creamy Tomato Soup and not only satisfy your need for homemade comfort, but do it with minimal effort. Enjoy!


Crock Pot Creamy Tomato Soup

Servings: 6  • Size: 1-1/2 cups • Points +: 5 pts • Smart Points: 7 Calories: 177 • Fat: 10 g • Carb: 17 g • Fiber: 3 g • Protein: 8 g • Sugar: 8 g Sodium: 600 mg  • Cholesterol: 21 mg

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 cup finely diced celery
  • 1 cup finely diced carrots
  • 1 cup finely diced onions
  • 28 oz. can whole plum tomatoes, with juice
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil
  • 3 1/2 cups reduced sodium chicken broth (or vegetable for vegetarians)
  • Parmesan or Romano cheese rind (optional)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/3 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese
  • 1 3/4 cups reduced fat (2%) milk, warmed
  • salt, to taste
  • black pepper, to taste

Directions:

Heat a large skillet over medium heat, then add the oil, celery, carrots and onions; cook 5 to 6 minutes, or until golden. Add to slow cooker.

Pour the juice of the tomatoes into the slow cooker, then roughly crush the tomatoes with your hands; add to slow cooker. Then add chicken (or vegetable broth), the cheese rind (if using) thyme, basil, and bay leaf.

Cover and cook on LOW for 6 hours, until the vegetables get soft and the flavors blend. Remove the cheese rid and, using an immersion blender, blend the soup until smooth (or you can carefully do this in small batches in the blender).

Melt the butter over low heat in a large skillet and add the flour. Stir constantly with a whisk for 4 to 5 minutes. Slowly whisk in about 1 cup of the hot soup, then add the 1 3/4 cups of warmed milk and stir until smooth. Pour back into the slow cooker and stir, add the grated Pecorino cheese and adjust salt and pepper, to taste.

Cover and cook on low 30 more minutes.

Makes about 9 1/4 cups.

SOURCE: Skinnytaste.com

 

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

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January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, and ICSEW wants you to know that there’s a lot you can do to prevent cervical cancer.

HPV (human papillomavirus) is a very common infection that spreads through sexual activity. About 79 million Americans currently have HPV, but many people with HPV don’t know they are infected. HPV is also a major cause of cervical cancer. Each year, more than 11,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer.

The good news?

The HPV vaccine (shot) can prevent HPV. Cervical cancer can often be prevented with regular screening tests (called Pap tests) and follow-up care.

In honor of National Cervical Health Awareness Month, ICSEW encourages:
Women to start getting regular Pap tests at age 21
Parents to make sure pre-teens get the HPV vaccine at age 11 or 12

Teens and young adults also need to get the HPV vaccine if they didn’t get it as pre-teens. Women up to age 26 and men up to age 21 can still get the vaccine.

Thanks to the health care reform law, you and your family members may be able to get these services at no cost to you. Check with your insurance company to learn more.

Did you know?

The FDA has approved a two-dose schedule for the Gardasil HPV vaccine for males and females ages 9-14?

Taking small steps can help keep you safe and healthy.

To learn more visit the National Cervical Cancer Coalition at http://www.nccc-online.org/

 

First 6-month-old ‘graduate’ from HCA’s Infants at the Workplace program

By: Laurel Bennett, HCA

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Anaya Darlene turned 6 months old recently and became the first “graduate” of HCA’s Infants at the Workplace program. Anaya’s mom is Talia Mazzara, HCA (left), and her backup work caretaker is Joanna Gaffney, HCA (right). Eight infants—some not yet born!—have been approved for the program since it began in July this year, with five reporting to the office so far.

 

Diabetes, knowing more can save your life!

diabetes

By Marina Woodard

Diabetes is a condition when the body’s inability to convert food into energy resulted from the pancreas failure to produce enough or any insulin. Over time, the high blood sugar (glucose) levels caused by the condition can lead to several health problems and complications. According to the statistics provided by the American Diabetes Association and Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people or 9.3% population have diabetes (21 million diagnosed, and 8.1 million undiagnosed). Millions more are at great risk of developing the condition. Further, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in United States in 2013.

There are three types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational.

  • Type 1: This type, also known as Juvenile diabetes, is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. This is a form of diabetes where the body’s pancreas produces little to no insulin that the body needs to break down sugar to survive, resulting in increase of high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period. The cause to this condition is still unknown. People with type 1 diabetes often develop autoimmune system disorders such as thyroid and gastrointestinal diseases. Treatment of type 1 diabetes requires daily injections of insulin. Insulin cannot be administered orally.
  • Type 2: This type, also called adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose). Your body uses sugar as a source of fuel. Unlike type 1, type 2 diabetics produce insulin; however the pancreas either does not secrete enough or the body is resistance to the insulin produced (insulin resistance), which causes the glucose level to rise higher than normal. This is also known as hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). The cause can be hereditary-, lifestyle, excessive body weight and lack of exercise. Over time, this condition can cause health problems such as blindness and glaucoma, foot complications, skin problems, high blood pressures, heart problems, nerve damage and many more. Treatment of type 2 diabetes varies including diet, oral medication and perhaps insulin.
  • Gestational: Develops and diagnosed during late pregnancy and often occurs to women who have no prior history of diabetes. The gestational diabetes is caused by the malfunctioning of insulin production due to the presence of placenta that releases the hormone to help the baby grow. This makes it harder for the body to produce or use insulin (insulin resistance). The risk factors include obesity, history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, pre-diabetes, ethnicity, parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes, history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and previous high weight birth of over 9 lbs. Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of C-section delivery due to a larger than normal fetus, pre-eclampsia, depression and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

Diabetes Management and Awareness: Learn the symptoms since diabetes (especially type 2) may often go undiagnosed or simply mistaken for other common illnesses. Symptoms of diabetes include extreme thirst, frequent urination, sudden weight lost, increased appetite, sudden vision change and etc. Knowing the signs and early stages of diabetes can save your life or the life of your loved ones. There is no cure for diabetes, but it can be managed with diet, exercise and medicine. Living with diabetes can be frustrating and overwhelming, but it can be managed with proper care from doctors as well as your good management plan.

To learn more about diabetes, go to America Diabetes Association at www.diabetes.org or for public employees diabetes prevention resources go to HCA Public Employees Benefits Diabetes Prevention.

2016 Annual Toiletries Drive for Olympia YWCA

This year we are kicking off our annual toiletries drive at Conference!

ICSEW Toiletries Drive August 16 — September 2, 2016

Highly Needed Items

  • Laundry Soap
  • Diapers (sizes 4, 5, 6)
  • Shampoo/Conditioner
  • Feminine Hygiene Products
  • Deodorant
  • Toilet Paper Tissue-Kleenex
  • Paper Towels

Other Items Pull-ups

  • Razors/Shave Cream
  • Tissue – Kleenex
  • Lotions/Moisturizers
  • Toothbrushes
  • Diaper Wipes
  • Paper Towels
  • Q-Tips
  • Liquid Hand Soap (no bar soap)
  • Toothpaste
  • Dish Soap
  • Travel/Trial Size Hygiene Kits (unopened)

The Other Bank no longer accepts the following donations: cosmetics, hair styling products/tools, perfume/cologne, medicine, contact lens solution, supplements/vitamins, toys, food.

For more information about The Other Bank, please visit http://ywcaofolympia.org/program/other-bank.