Commentary: Black Community Business Resource Group on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Editor’s Note: Today is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. The Washington State Black Community Business Resource Group has submitted an article about Dr. King’s Legacy and the work the group is doing to apply diverse perspectives and experiences to the examination of the issues facing the state of Washington.

Martin Luther King, Jr
Martin Luther King, Jr. Photo from Wikemedia Commons

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Day Message 2020

Submitted by the Washington State Black Community Business Resource Group

Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968), was a man of great integrity, values and principles. If alive today, Reverend Dr. King would be 91 years old. Leading the effort toward social justice and equality, Reverend Dr. King’s impact went beyond his local community to inspire change in America and the world. In 1964, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

In 1986, President Ronald Reagan signed into law, an American federal holiday marking the birthday of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This day is officially observed the third Monday of January each year (sometimes referred to as MLK Day) which annually coincides with Reverend King’s birthday, January 15.

Reverend Dr. King taught us that there are far more commonalities that unite us than divide us. He often remarked in speeches delivered across the nation, that if we all took time to talk and get to know our neighbors, we would find that our values, ethics, morals and sense of justice are strikingly aligned. He was the first to acknowledge that while people may disagree on policies and procedures, we are generally in agreement on humanitarian causes centered on love, peace, and compassion. In recognition of his nonviolent works towards hope, peace, and prosperity of all Americans, this year let us refocus our attention on the elements of life that draw us together and less on the conversations the divides us.

Each year the month of February is dedicated to honoring and remembering the numerous achievements of Black Americans. The year’s Black History Month Theme, African Americans and the Vote, set by the Association for the Study of African American Life and Heritage (ASALH), would have been preaching to the choir for Reverend Dr. King. He intensely understood the importance of the right to vote in the right for equality. In 1957, he delivered a speech entitled Give Us the Ballot, where he argued that if we (Black Americans) had the right to vote, we would by voting, receive our basic rights.

As the newest Washington State Business Resource Group, we (the Black Community Business Resource Group) seek opportunities to engage communities around Washington. Our commitment is to share our perspectives on the varying aspects of the social, historical, and current trends in equity, diversity, and inclusion from the Black Community viewpoint. As part of this effort and journey, we welcome and value allies from all communities to join us in this transformative venture.

In the words of musical genius Stevie Wonder (circa 1979):

“If we cannot celebrate a man who died for love, then how can we say we believe in it? It is up to me and you!”  

Happy Birthday, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr!

group picture of members of the Washington State Black Community Business Resource Group
Members of the Black Community Business Resource Group

About the Black Community Business Resource Group:

 Statewide business resource groups, BRGs, bring together groups of employees and their allies who have a common interest or characteristic. . BRG members bring their unique knowledge and perspectives, making them an asset to state business needs such as recruitment and retention.

The Black Community BRG Goals Include:

  • Promote state government as an employer of choice supporting efforts that increase representation of individuals of the Black Community at all levels of employment.
  • Better the lives of state employees through advocacy, outreach, opportunity, and advisement to the Governor and agencies on policies that affect state-employed black people, and ultimately, communities in which they live and serve.
  • Contribute to a more diverse understanding of the unique, multi-faceted aspects of the Black Community in Washington State.
  • Integrate the history, cultural experiences, values, and knowledge of both black people and their allies into the workforce of Washington State government.
  • Provide advice and assistance to state agencies regarding strategies to hire, retain, and develop black people in Washington State government.
  • Apply diverse perspectives and experiences to the examination of the issues facing Washington State. Diverse perspectives enhance the fullness of our understanding of these issues and open opportunities for the consideration of new ideas and better solutions.

 Questions? Email BlackCommunityBRG@OFM.WA.Gov

 Black Community Business Resource Group Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Community-Organization/WA-State-Black-Community-Business-Resource-Group-111351510275919/

 

Tips to Keep the Holidays Stress Free

holiday-stress

Editor’s Note: this article first appeared on the Washington State Department of Corrections’ intranet.

The holidays are in full swing. That means extra guests, menu planning, events and managing budgets. Here are some tips on how to manage stress during the festivities.

Tips for Dealing With Holiday Stress 

  • Make Your Well Being a Priority If you don’t take care of yourself no one else will. And if you wish to care for others remember, just like on an airplane, be sure to secure your own oxygen mask before assisting others with theirs.                                   
  • Identify Your Stressors We all have particular family members or events that press our buttons, it is important that you know what they are. Identifying the problem is the first step to solving one.                                                                                   
  • Plan Proactively Now that you’ve identified your stressors, how can you handle those situations differently? How can you change your attitude toward those people and events to make things tolerable and even meaningful to you?                                   
  • Get Adequate Rest Put down the phone and tablet 30 minutes before you go to bed. Create a schedule that allows for the sleep you need and stick to it. The Walking Dead isn’t just a TV show.                                                                                                            
  • Maintain Healthy Eating Habits Don’t eat your feelings. Fuel your body, live your life and reflect on your feelings. Practice portion control and eat and drink in moderation. Experiment with mindful eating, using the senses in each bite and slowly savoring the flavors and moment.                                                                                
  • Maintain Healthy Exercise Habits Was there ever a better time to begin practicing some healthy stress management? Exercise can help you manage a stressful situation, give you a sense of accomplishment, and give you a pleasant endorphin rush! Remember that exercise comes in many forms, going to the gym, running, walking, actively playing with your pets or kids, dancing, climbing walls, video workouts of all sorts…Anything that gets your blood pumping.                                         
  • Practice Gratitude The holidays are a great time to reflect on the blessings in your lives. Try thinking about a time in the last month when you had a genuine moment of connection with another person, an animal or in nature. Reflect on that experience. What in this experience are you grateful for?                                                   
  • Connect Meaningfully with Others Use the holidays as an opportunity to intentionally spend time with people you care about. The holidays also present several opportunities to volunteer in your community both formally and informally.                                                                                                                                      
  • Have a Sense of Humor It won’t all be perfect, but at least we can laugh about it! Laughter can help you manage the stress and put that stress into the perspective it deserves.  

 Resources

The Department of Enterprise Services offers an  Employee Assistance Program for state workers at: https://des.wa.gov/services/hr-finance/washington-state-employee-assistance-program-eap (877) 313-4455

You can also get help for yourself or a loved one by calling the National Suicide Prevention hotline: (800) 273-8255

 

 

Laura Watson Named Director of Ecology

portrait of Laura Watson
Newly-appointed Dept. of Ecology Director Laura Watson

From the Office of Gov. Jay Inslee:

OLYMPIA–Gov. Jay Inslee named Laura Watson director of the Washington State Department of Ecology today. She replaces Maia Bellon, who Inslee appointed in 2013.

“Laura is a proven leader who is deeply committed to protecting our state’s air, water and land,” Inslee said. “She has a deep understanding of the crucial work Ecology does statewide and was at the center of some of the most important issues in recent years. I know she will build on the transformative work that Maia has done at Ecology and I look forward to welcoming her to my cabinet.”

Watson is currently the senior assistant attorney general in the Ecology Division of the Attorney General’s Office. As chief legal counsel to the Director of the Department of Ecology, she provided advice and representation to Ecology’s 10 environmental programs and to the agency’s administration.

Watson was also a former deputy solicitor general at the Solicitor General’s Office in the Attorney General’s Office.

She served as Washington’s lead counsel on several legal challenges to the Trump administration’s rollback of environmental protections and is representing Washington in its challenge to EPA’s proposed repeal of Washington’s fish consumption rule. She has also defended the state’s environmental laws in the Washington State Supreme Court, including a case that upheld the state’s multi-million dollar hazardous substance tax. More recently, she defended a case about the state’s landmark greenhouse gas regulation, the Clean Air Rule.

Watson has advised on a wide array of Washington’s most pressing environmental issues including: cleanup at the Hanford nuclear site, toxics reduction strategies, protection of the State’s Clean Water Act authority against federal intrusion, and options for achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Watson volunteered with Thurston County Volunteer Legal Services, providing legal advice to low-income residents. She currently volunteers with Quixote Communities, a non-profit organization that builds and operates tiny homes, which offers permanent supportive housing to formerly homeless individuals.

Watson earned her law degree from the University of Washington School of Law. She earned her bachelor’s degree in philosophy, with a women’s studies certificate, from the University of Pittsburgh. She lives in West Olympia with her husband, Dan, who is a professor of mechanical engineering at St. Martin’s University. Their daughter, Violet, is in middle school and is spearheading the family’s efforts to become a zero-waste household.

Bellon is the longest serving ecology director in Washington state history. She steps down from the director position later this month.

“Maia’s leadership at Ecology and comprehensive understanding of issues that affect our state has protected Washington’s quality of life and its economy,” Inslee said. “I thank Maia for her years of service and for all she has done for Washington.”

Immigrant Network Business Resource Group Meeting Discusses Diversity Jan. 6

Washington Immigrant Network Logo

OLYMPIA–Are you interested in learning about or joining the Washington Immigrant Network (WIN), a business resource group designed to support current and former Washington state employees?

WIN will be hosting its next meeting from noon to 1:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 6, in the Liquor and Cannabis Board’s Columbia River Room 108 and 109 (1025 Union Avenue SE, Olympia, WA 98504).

Diversity Consultant Jarrod Irvin with the Department of Corrections will be the keynote speaker. You can find the meeting’s agenda here.

WIN’s mission “is to expand opportunities for immigrants who are current and future employees within Washington state government. The group serves as a resource for all immigrants who are state employees to connect, share and educate each other and Washington state agencies on the skills, expertise and cultural value of a diverse workforce.”

WIN defines “immigrant” as someone who was or has a parent who was born in a foreign country.

According to the Office of Financial Management, “Statewide business resource groups (BRGs) bring together groups of employees and their allies who have a common interest or characteristic. All BRGs have a charter, mission, goals and bylaws and contribute to an overall statewide business strategy.  BRG members bring their unique knowledge and perspectives, making them an asset to state business needs, such as recruitment and retention.”

You can learn more about all the BRGs here.

Take a Step Back in Time During Upcoming Governor’s Mansion “1909” Tour

chandelier
A chandelier hangs from the ceiling of the Governor’s Mansion in Olympia. Photo by Rachel Friederich

OLYMPIA – The Governor’s Mansion Foundation will host a special “1909 Housewarming History” presentation during its Wednesday Mansion tours Jan. 8 and 15, 2020.

The tours, guided by Foundation docents will feature a first person presentation by “Zephorina Cosgrove;” wife of then Washington Governor Samuel Cosgrove. Cosgrove served as the sixth governor of the state of Washington and was a U.S. Civil War veteran and educator. Unfortunately, Governor Cosgrove became very ill after his fall election and died two months after his January inauguration — never living in the Mansion. “Mrs. Cosgrove’s” January presentation will highlight the events in January 1909 when the then new Governor’s Mansion opened its doors to dignitaries and Olympia residents for the first time.

How to Get a Spot on the Tour

Mansion tours are on a first-come, first-served basis. Each tour is open to 25 guests and times are 1:00, 1:20 and 1:40 p.m. Reservations MUST be made at least 24-hours in advance. To make a reservation go to https://apps.des.wa.gov/Mansion/Mansion.aspx . For questions or additional information, please contact the State Capitol Tour Office at (360) 902-8880.

Adult tour guests must present photo identification and all visitors under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. No umbrellas, strollers, or food/drink will be allowed on the tour. The Mansion is accessible to wheelchairs and walkers. Visitors must walk a 200-yard incline up to the entrance.

Visitors to the Georgian-style mansion, situated on a bluff overlooking Capitol Lake, Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains, will get a 25- minute walking tour of the Mansion. The circa-1908 Mansion is the oldest building on Olympia’s Capitol Campus. Visitors will get guided tours of the Mansion’s permanent collection of antique furnishings and Northwest artwork, including the renowned wall-size murals of Washington scenes in the state dining room.

About the Foundation: 

The Governor’s Mansion Foundation, an all-volunteer, non-profit, non-partisan organization, hosts weekly tours of the Mansion on most Wednesdays (except holidays and the month of August). For more information on the GMF, visit https://wagovmansion.org/

Trailblazing for Women’s Equity on and off the Court

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared on the Washington State Department of Corrections’ website.

Story and photos by Rachel Friederich, Washington State Department of Corrections
Portrait of woman in front of a brick building
Women Who Make a Difference: Corrections Specialist Lynne Newark helps incarcerated women with long histories of trauma live healthy, productive lives. She was also one of the starts on her high school’s first girls basketball team following enactment of Title IX. Photo by Rachel Friederich

GIG HARBOR – “When our powers combine, we change lives.”

Those are the words displayed above Corrections Specialist Lynne Newark’s computer. She repeats the words to participants in her cognitive behavioral intervention classes at Washington Corrections Center for Women.

“Those are some of the affirmations I go by,” Newark said. “If I am motivated, it’s going to be easy for me to motivate. And it’s going to be easier for others to become motivated.”

It’s also a mantra she’s lived since high school. Newark (whose maiden name is Nitschke) helped her school’s first girls’ basketball team win the state championship following a 33-game winning streak. Newark’s team, the Jamestown North Dakota Blue Jays, were the school’s first girls basketball team following enactment of Title IX. President Richard Nixon signed the landmark Title IX law in 1972. It prohibits gender discrimination in federally funded education programs, including sports.

The Right to Play

Sports have always played an important role in Newark’s life. She started playing softball in elementary school, began running track in the eighth grade, and ended up becoming a seven-time state track and field qualifier by the time she graduated high school.

Newark yearned to play basketball. But without a girls’ basketball coach, she had to teach her herself. Occasionally, there would be a basketball activity in her school’s regular gym class. But Newark honed her skills by watching the boys’ games and imitating what she saw with a backyard basketball hoop.

“I had to sit and watch back then,” Newark said. “We didn’t have the right, if you will, to have a girls’ team or be part of the boys’ team. I learned to play by watching and then I would go do it.”

Newark recalled most of the “official” girls sports the school had before Title IX were mostly no-contact sports, like golf, swimming and track. Even in track, the longest running distance for girls was shorter than that for boys.

“It was of long-standing belief that girls were ‘too delicate’ back then,” Newark said.

Newark said many of the girls with whom she played sports were natural athletes and shared her competitive spirit. So they were ecstatic in 1973 when they found out they could sign up for the girls’ basketball team.

“I wanted to play,” Newark said. “Finally! We’re getting our chance. Finally! We have a girls’ team. Basketball was something I’d been doing forever and now I get the chance to be a part of a team to do that.”

A Winning Team

newspaper photo from 1974 Jamestown High School of girls basketball players holding trophy
Lynne Newark (then Lynne Nitschke), far left, stands next to her teammates. Newark’s team, the Blue jays was the school’s first girls basketball team. They went on to win the 1974 Class A girls basketball North Dakota state championship. Photo courtesy of the Jamestown Sun

Newark says despite Title IX guaranteeing the same access to sports and program activities, there were still resources the girls’ team lacked that would be unheard of today.

Newark and her teammates had to create makeshift basketball jerseys by taping numbers to the back of track uniforms. The girls’ team also had fewer coaches than the boys’ team. And neither team had athletic trainers.

Newark said it didn’t dampen the team’s spirit because, “When you’re young like that, we were just happy we got to play. We didn’t play the ‘poor me card.’ We didn’t question, ‘if the boys got this, why don’t the girls get this?’ We didn’t care if we had to wear the track uniforms and tape on our numbers. We just wanted to play.”

Before Title IX, one in 27 girls played sports, according to the , which advocates for girls and women to reach their potential in sports and life through coaching resources and various programming. Today that number is two in five.

The Blue Jays efforts earned the team some major props. On Oct. 4, 2019, Jamestown High School (JHS) honored Newark, 10 teammates and two coaches. They returned to JHS as part of a ceremony inducting the 1974 girls’ basketball team into the Jamestown High School Athletic Hall of Fame.

“We won that championship 45 years ago, but it seems like yesterday,” Newark said. “When we all got together, it was so unbelievable we still had such a connection. Granted we’re all wearing reading glasses now, and some of our perspectives have changed. It was like 45 years hadn’t even passed.”

Sports remained a huge part of Newark’s life post-high school. After graduating from Jamestown, she attended Dickinson State University (DSU) in North Dakota. During college, she ran track and played volleyball and basketball. In 1979, she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education. DSU inducted Newark into it’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2006.

Newark enlisted in the United States Air Force and served in the Air Force for four years as a radio communications analyst. During that time, she played on the military base sports teams including volleyball, basketball and softball.

After leaving the Air Force, she and her husband, whom she met in the military, moved to Corvallis, Oregon. Newark did some substitute teaching at local schools while coaching high school volleyball, basketball and track. During the summers, Newark worked at the local parks and recreation department as a youth sports coordinator.

From the Court to Corrections

Woman standing in front of white board with post-it notes.
Correctional Specialist Lynne Newark is a Beyond Trauma and Moving on instructor at Washington Corrections Center for Women. Photo by Rachel Friederich

In 1989, the Department of Corrections hired Newark as a recreation specialist at the former McNeil Island Corrections Center (MICC). She worked at MICC for four years and then spent three years at the former Tacoma Pre-Release Center. She and her husband decided to move to Greece. While in Greece, Newark worked for the Morale, Welfare and Recreation division of the military.

In 2003, Newark returned to the states and got a job as a recreation specialist at Washington Corrections Center for Women. In 2016, she became a corrections specialist.

Newark currently facilitates two programs, Moving On and Beyond Violence. The programs are designed specifically for incarcerated women. Historically, corrections practices had been tailored for incarcerated males. But in recent years, studies have shown those practices can’t be used in the same way when caring for incarcerated females. And the need is becoming more urgent. According to the National Resource Center on Justice Involved Women (pdf), the number of women in U.S. prisons has increased by more than 700% and has outpaced men by more than 50%.

The department launched these programs as part of its work in its Gender Responsive Initiative. The initiative trains prison staff to focus on specific needs of incarcerated females. It includes developing more gender responsive programming, educating staff on effects of trauma, creating risk and needs assessments for women and making female-specific clothing and hygiene products available to incarcerated women.

Newark has impacted the lives of countless women over the years. The women she interacts with often have stories of untold violence, drug addiction and anguish. Many have been victims of sexual assault before ever entering the justice system. Most have not been shown what it means to live a healthy lifestyle.

Newark has incorporated the life lessons she’s learned from sports into the classroom. Her goal is to help the women cope with the effects of what’s often a lifetime of trauma that has led to their incarceration.

For example, one of her classes has a unit on crossroads. The women self-reflect on the past choices they’ve made that led them to their crimes. Newark says the decision to join the high school track team, as an eighth-grader, was her crossroads. At first, her parents didn’t want her to join the team. But they relented after much poking and prodding from Newark. Newark says it was her saving grace.

“I tell my students that was my crossroads,” Newark said. “If my parents hadn’t allowed me to use my competitiveness and energy towards sports, I would have gone in the same direction as my friend, who got addicted to drugs and alcohol. It kept me grounded. It kept me active. It kept me focused on the taking the right fork in the road.”

Newark said coaching the women is like coaching athletes. She says the best part about her job is seeing people change.

“Seeing and hearing improvement in self-confidence is what is really impactful,” Newark said. “Having a student start off really ambivalent and then the light goes on and the switch in thinking happens. It’s a very powerful moment for everyone.”

The Next Chapter

What’s next for Newark? Newark is retiring in February 2020 after 23 years in corrections. She and her husband are planning on moving back to Greece. And in May, in true athletic style, Newark will participate in the Camino Francés. It’s a 500 mile journey by foot that starts in St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port, France, crosses the Pyrenees mountains and finishes in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. On average, the walk takes between 32-35 days.

While Newark is on the trail, she’ll be living by the principles that have guided her on the basketball court and in her personal and professional life.

“If we want to make change, if we want to be the best that we can possibly be, we have to practice and we have to believe in ourselves and that we can do it.”

About the Author: Rachel Friederich is also the Communications Chair for the Interagency Committee of State Employed Women, ICSEW.

Ask the Employee Assistance Program: Holiday Parties

The Department of Enterprise Services’ Employee Assistance Program publishes a monthly Q&A column in its Frontline newsletter for supervisors. The following is an excerpt from the December Issue. You can read the full newsletter and subscribe to it here.

office workers sitting at tables

Question:

The holiday season seems like a good opportunity to host a party for appreciation and teambuilding, but I don’t want to assume that all employees celebrate Christmas. Do you have advice on how I can plan an inclusive holiday celebration?

Answer:

You’re right to assume that not everyone celebrates Christmas. In fact, according to the Pew Research Center, 10% of the U.S. population does not, and less than half celebrate it as a religious holiday. In Washington State, 4 out of every 10 people identify as something other than Christian. During the winter months, multiple religions and cultures observe important holidays. It’s not enough to simply rename a Christmas party as a “holiday” party, without recognizing religious diversity and supporting inclusion in the workplace. Do you know which holidays the employees in your workgroup celebrate, and how? This season, consider getting to know what’s important to your team members. Don’t risk placing them in a difficult situation where they feel obligated to attend an event or recognize a holiday that compromises their beliefs or leads them to feel not seen or valued.

Instead, ask employees about their cultural and religious preferences and practices, and show respect and support by learning more about and acknowledging their holidays. Employees will likely appreciate the thoughtfulness of you sharing a greeting for the holiday they observe—“Ramadan Mubarak” to a Muslim coworker during this sacred month, “Yom Tov” to a Jewish colleague observing Yom Kippur, and yes, “Merry Christmas” to the Christians in your workgroup during the last weeks of December and early January. Note that the dates of many religious observances change from year to year: a quick internet search will allow you to put reminders on your calendar for dates that are important to your coworkers, or in Outlook, simply go to File>Options>Calendar and click add holidays.

If your end goal is employee celebration, appreciation, and teambuilding, here are some other actions you can take around the holiday season: 1) Provide opportunities for employees to learn about various cultures and holiday celebrations, or to share about their own cultures, through displays or at events. 2) At celebrations, make sure foods, decorations, and activities are not associated with only one particular religion (the colors of Hanukkah are blue and white, and for Kwanzaa, black, red, and green). 3) Instead of a holiday party, have an end-of-year celebration of accomplishments and contributions. 4) When planning an event or party, be mindful not to schedule it on a day when someone might be fasting or observing a holy day. 5) Make sure to accommodate schedules for religious holidays – it’s the law.

Remember, respecting diversity doesn’t mean ignoring religious celebrations. Employee engagement increases when employees feel safe and encouraged to bring their whole selves to work and feel valued for who they are, not just what they do.

Tips for a Good Night’s Sleep

Editor’s note: The Washington State Department of Enterprise Services‘ Employee Assistance Program publishes a monthly Frontline newsletter that’s full of tips for maintaining a healthy work life balance and tips to succeed in the workplace. It’s available to all state employees. You can read this month’s newsletter here, as well as sign up to receive the monthly newsletter. Below is one of this month’s articles:

sleep

Tips for a Good Night’s Sleep:

Set a schedule: Go to bed at a set time each night and get up at the same time each morning. Disrupting this schedule may lead to insomnia. “Sleeping in” on weekends also makes it harder to wake up early on Monday morning because it resets your sleep cycles for a later awakening.

Exercise: Try to exercise 20 to 30 minutes a day. Daily exercise often helps people sleep, although a workout soon before bedtime may interfere with sleep. For maximum benefit, try to get your exercise about 5 to 6 hours before going to bed.

Avoid caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol: Avoid drinks that contain caffeine, which acts as a stimulant and keeps people awake. Sources of caffeine include coffee, chocolate, soft drinks, non-herbal teas, diet drugs, and some pain relievers. Smokers tend to sleep very lightly and often wake up in the early morning due to nicotine withdrawal. Alcohol robs people of deep sleep and REM sleep and keeps them in the lighter stages of sleep.

Relax before bed: A warm bath, reading, or another relaxing routine can make it easier to fall sleep. You can train yourself to associate certain restful activities with sleep and make them part of your bedtime ritual. Sleep until sunlight: If possible, wake up with the sun, or use very bright lights in the morning. Sunlight helps the body’s internal biological clock reset itself each day. Sleep experts recommend exposure to an hour of morning sunlight for people having problems falling asleep.

Don’t lie in bed awake: If you can’t get to sleep, don’t just lie in bed. Do something else, like reading, watching television, or listening to music, until you feel tired. The anxiety of being unable to fall asleep can actually contribute to insomnia.

Control your room temperature: Maintain a comfortable temperature in the bedroom. Extreme temperatures may disrupt sleep or prevent you from falling asleep.

See a doctor if the sleeping problem continues: If you have trouble falling asleep night after night, or if you always feel tired the next day, then you may have a sleep disorder and should see a physician. Your primary care physician may be able to help you; if not, you can probably find a sleep specialist at a major hospital.

Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

First Native American Woman Appointed to Washington State Supreme Court

portrait for Raquel Montoya-Lewis
Raquel-Montoya Lewis, the first Native American woman to be appointed to the Washington State Supreme Court

OLYMPIA–Gov. Jay Inslee helped usher in a historic day for the Washington State Supreme Court when he appointed Judge Raquel Montoya-Lewis as the first Native American justice Dec. 4 in Olympia.

Montoya-Lewis has more than 20 years of judicial experience, including five on the Whatcom County Superior Court. She spent years working with tribal communities in Washington and elsewhere, and is uniquely familiar with the challenges that tribal and rural communities face. She also worked on issues to protect children from exploitation, and received the Children’s Advocacy Center Community Leadership Award in 2018.

“Because Judge Montoya-Lewis is Native American, many will focus on the historic nature of this appointment,” Inslee said. “And it’s entirely appropriate to do so. But I want the record to show that Judge Montoya-Lewis is the kind of exceptional judge I want serving on the highest court in our state because she is the best person for the job.”

Read the rest of the story on the Governor’s Medium Page.

Upcoming Workshops With Compass Consulting

Past ICSEW presenter Amy Leneker with Compass Consulting has some upcoming half day workshops:

What will I learn?

Have you ever tried to achieve work/life balance but ended up exhausted and feeling like you’re not succeeding in work or life? There’s a better way! In this fun and informative workshop, you will learn three strategies that you can apply immediately for yourself and for your team.

Work/Life Integration in 3 Steps
December 16, 2019
8:00 – 11:30 Register here 
OR
1:00 – 4:30 Register here

Can we bring this training to our agency?

Yes! I can offer this training at your agency – it is a convenient and cost-effective way to provide this training to your employees. See attached flyer.

Are there other half-day trainings available?

Yes! This is just one of many half-day trainings that I offer. See attached flyer.

If you have any questions, please let me know.  I hope to see you on December 16.

Amy Leneker, MPA

Leadership Consultant &

Certified Dare to Lead™ Facilitator

Email                    Amy@CompassConsultingTeam.com

Phone                   (360) 701-9022

Web                       www.CompassConsultingTeam.com

LinkedIn               https://www.linkedin.com/in/amyleneker/

AmyLenekerWorkLifeWorkshopAmyLenekerHalfDayTrainings